Calm waters or tidal wave?
Regulatory evolution 2020 as predicted through a historical lens

1 CE credit

Presenters

Dale J. Atkinson, ASWB Legal Counsel

Julie Maciura, Managing Partner, Steinecke Maciura LeBlanc

Moderator

Endsley Real, REAL Committee

Description

Attorneys will provide a working knowledge of:

  • Shared waters—The history of government regulation of the occupations and professions from both U.S. and Canadian perspectives
  • Estuaries—Various trends in regulation
  • Surf’s up—The influence of regulatory trends on future government involvement in regulation of the occupations and professions

Learning Objectives

After completing this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the history of social work regulation in the United States and Canada.
  2. Name three trends in regulation.
  3. Identify one implication for how a trend may affect the future of social work regulation in their jurisdiction.

Presentation

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References

Professional Standards Authority, “Right Touch Regulation in Practice: International Perspectives” (September 2018), Discussion Paper, online: <www.professionalstandards.org.uk/docs/default-source/publications/thought-paper/right-touch-regulation-in-practice---international-perspectives.pdf?sfvrsn=a5b97520_8>.

Professional Standards Authority, “Right Touch Reform: A New Framework for Assurance of Professions” (November 2017), Discussion Paper, online: <www.professionalstandards.org.uk/docs/default-source/publications/thought-paper/right-touch-reform-2017.pdf?sfvrsn=2e5173>.

Malcom K Sparrow, The Regulatory Craft: Controlling Risks, Solving Problems, and Managing Compliance (Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution, 2000).

Darrel Pink, “When Public Interest Work isn’t Very Public” (June 26, 2018), Darrel Pink (blog), online: <http://www.darrelpink.ca/governance/when-public-interest-work-isnt-very-public/>.

Martin Lodge, “Accountability and Transparency in Regulation: Critiques, Doctrines and Instruments” in Jacint Jordana & David Levi-Faur, eds, The Politics of Regulation (Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2004) 352. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/5a15/dca7c343285813db75e998c0187d3dde437a.pdf

Robert Baldwin & Julia Black, “Driving Priorities in Risk-based Regulation: What’s the Problem?” (2016) 43:4 JL & Soc’y, 565, online: <https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/jols.12003>.

Adam Dodek & Emily Alderson, “Risk Regulation for the Legal Profession” (2018) 55:3 Alta L Rev, online: <https://www.albertalawreview.com/index.php/ALR/article/view/2448/2437>.

Rebecca Durcan, “Applying Risk-Based Regulation”, Grey Areas: A Commentary on Legal Issues Affecting Professional Regulation (September 2017), online: <http://www.sml-law.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Greyar219-RD.pdf>.

McMaster Health Forum, “Modernizing the Oversight of the Health Workforce in Ontario” (August 2017), Citizen Brief, online: <https://www.mcmasterforum.org/docs/default-source/product-documents/citizen-briefs/workforce-oversight-cb.pdf?sfvrsn=2>.

Therese Jennissen & Colleen Lundy, “Keeping Sight of Social Justice: 80 years of Building CASW”, Canadian Association of Social Workers, online: <https://www.casw-acts.ca/sites/default/files/attachements/casw_history.pdf>.

Alberta Energy Regulator, “The Alberta Model for Regulatory Excellence” (April 2016), online: <https://www.aer.ca/documents/about-us/RegulatoryExcellence_Model.PDF>.

Cary Coglianese, “Listening • Learning • Leading: A Framework for Regulatory Excellence” (Report issued at Penn Program on Regulation’s Best-in-Class Regulator Initiative, 21 October 2015), online: <https://www.aer.ca/documents/about-us/UPenn_Final_Report_Regulatory_Excellence.pdf>.